Continuing the Math Writing Process

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As some of you might already know, one of my goals this year is to find strategies to help my students write better mathematical explanations. My students have been making progress towards that goal.  I see glimpses here and there where students are putting together more concrete statements and transitioning them into coherent explanations.  It’s good news – and making progress helps the students see that growth is happening.  We all need that boost every once in a while – or even more than that. Last week, students were asked to fill out a rubric and evaluate their own mathematical writing.  I then went over and highlighted my responses in a different color.

I passed those papers back early last week and the class had a conversation about the difference between my scores and theirs.  It was a productive conversation and I believe the kids left with a better understanding of what the categories in the rubric mean.  For the next couple days the class reviewed measurement concepts and place value.

The next stage of this mathematical writing process was for students to evaluate the writing of another student.  I’m finding myself using more retrieval practice strategies for this particular process and critiquing others writing multiple times has helped (at least I believe) them become better at recognizing rubric elements in their own writing.  I also want to give students multiples opportunities that are spread out with assessing and self-assessing strategies.  I tried this before earlier with some success, but this was also before students created the writing rubric that we’re using now.  Students read the prompt on magnitude estimates, read over what the writer created and filled out the rubric.

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The students carefully read through the prompt and then throughly read through the response.  During this time the classroom was so quiet.  Some students used highlighters while others were very critical with the pencil.  I even had a few students ask the writer about their response on the paper – future teacher maybe?

Near the end of the class I reviewed the responses and the students voted on where they thought this writing would fit on the rubric.  I’d say around 50-60% of the students were on target with all the rubric selections.  This improvement is telling and I’m excited to see growth in this area.

Next week I’m planning on introducing a different math writing prompt.  This will be their second attempt and will be used as a formative checkpoint.  The class will then continue this journey after winter break.

  • Shoutout to the MAA site and people for helping me thinking of additional ideas for this math writing process

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