Thoughts on a “normal” return

The last time I saw a full class of students in-person was March 2020. I’ve been teaching in a remote/hybrid model since then. Along with many educators, I’ve had to change my approach, learn new skills and find ways to reach students in a different way. My platform has drastically changed to a digital model. Schools have also had to change the way in which they provide support for the community. 2020 was a rough year. It also provided us with a different perspective on how schools can address needs of students and staff.

My hope is that August 2021 will look different than August 2020. With that being said, I also hope education changes because of what has happened. Let’s analyze what worked well during remote/hybrid learning and what didn’t. I’d like to continue some of the processes that have been used this year and possibly discard/replace others. This post is meant to reflect a bit on some positive shifts that might be beneficial moving forward.

1.) Online meetings and professional development Part of me wonders why we haven’t been doing this all along. In my experience, staff meets are generally used to communicate information to staff. Many times this can be written up in an email. I think having virtual staff meetings encourages the organizers to parse down the content to what’s important and to give time for staff the ask questions as needed. It also helps that specific questions for individuals can be addressed by the presenter as they stay on the Zoom session while others exit the meeting. I’m going on a limb here and say this could also apply to district meetings, professional development, and school-wide assemblies. I feel like this year the professional development has been more applicable than any other year. It helps that the presents are in-house.

2.) Emphasis on social and emotional needs Ever since the pandemic began I’ve noticed an increased emphasis on addressing SEL needs. Districts have tried to implement SEL programs to encourage students to talk and to work with one another. Some districts are even trying to create opportunities for students to come back into the school so they’re able to receive in-person time with staff. Breakout rooms and meet-ups have taken place to encourage this type of collaboration. Teachers have also been part of this initiative as many administrators recognize that self-care should be required.

3.) Hybrid/Remote models Now, don’t get me wrong here. I think in-person instruction is the best bet for most students, but I think having a form of a blended model works better for others. I’ve seen some students shine with a hybrid and remote models and others that would certainly benefit from being in a classroom. Let’s not think of going back to “normal” school as the best option. I’m wondering how this will play-out during the 2021-22 school year. Time will tell.

4.) Digital resources and a learning management systems Going completely remote last March required teachers to make a hard transition. Most paper-based resources had to be converted. I initially used SeeSaw with my students and Canvas became available this school year. It was a steep learning curve but most teachers in the district are now more comfortable in creating digital assignments for their classes. Transferring non-digital curriculum resources to digital has been very time time consuming this year. I’m hoping that the resources created this year will be used next year. The lonely copy machine hasn’t been getting much love lately.


This year has required teachers and administrators to stretch like that haven’t before. It has been a stressful year. There have been some positive pieces that I’d like to see continued even as we move to a sense of normalcy next school year. It’ll be great when classrooms will once again be filled with students being able to work closely together, share/use math manipulatives, use vertical whiteboards, participate in school clubs, attend recess, have pe/music/art in a classroom, and attend field trips. I’m looking forward to the day, but until then let’s think about how education structures could potentially change moving forward.

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