Studying Women Mathematicians and Scientists

Rosalind Franklin and the two-strand model of DNA

This year my students have been learning about mathematicians and scientists. This exploration started back during Women’s history month in March. My 3rd-5th grade classes highlighted a different woman mathematician every week. We studied Ingrid Daubechies, Florence Nightingale, Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie during the month of March. Not surprising, the study of women mathematicians was new to most students in the classroom. That dynamic changed when I asked the students to explore Mathigon’s site on the history of math.

Students were tasked to review the different mathematicians on the timeline and their contributions to society. I also asked to students to review the posters on a class bulletin board.

By the beginning of April I felt like students were feeling confident with the four women mathematicians and students started to show interest in wanting to learning more. I decided to assign a women in mathematics (could have been titled women in STEM) project at the beginning of May. Students were asked to study a female mathematician from a list

The list was mainly created from the Mathigon site and the Women in STEM site. A google form was used for students to pick their mathematician. I used a Form add-on that eliminated a choice once a person was picked to ensure different mathematicians were chosen. I also asked students to email me if they would like to study another female mathematician that was not on the list. That is how Trachette Jackson and Shakuntala Devi were added.

Students were then asked to make a copy of a Google Slide presentation template. That template was used to help students organize their thinking about what a particular slide should contain. A rubric was also created in the process.

After that the students used a Nearpod collaboration board to brainstorm what a great presentation looks like. I gave the students time to write whatever came to mind. The document was saved and then shared with the students to keep them thinking about what might help improve their presentation moving forward.

Students were then given about 2-3 weeks to periodically work on the presentation. They used time in and outside of class. They used this resource site to gather information about the mathematician. I found early on that more resources were needed and that is why I eventually turned it into a Google Sheet. Feel free to make a copy if you would like to use a similar project in your classroom

After about two weeks students were asked to share what they have put together so far. Most had 3-4 slides completed. They shared via Zoom screen share (since there are elearners and in-person students in the same class) with a partner and gave constructive feedback. Students used the opinions shares to polish up their presentations.

After finalizing their projects in Slides students screen recorded the presentation. Students used iMove to add effects and some even added a voice over element to narrate the presentation.

I am proud of what the students created given the circumstances this year and am encouraged to see students learn more about women mathematicians. I am looking forward to next week when all of the projects will be shared.